What to Read??

Alrighty, all my bloggin’ buddies (I was going to combine those two words, but then it came to “bluddies” and that just sounded weird).  I need more books to read.  I need suggestions.  So… I would like you to tell me 1) Your favorite author; 2) Your favorite book; and 3)  A good book you have read recently that you would recommend.

And April, talking about your husband doesn’t count. 😉  We all want to read his book and I bet he’s awesome.  So you have to give me something else.  Heh.

Okay.  Books.  Go.

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13 responses to “What to Read??

  1. Well, I am going to talk about authors rather than books, because that seems easiest.

    You can’t go wrong with Alice Munro and her collections of short stories. They are not always “comfortable” to read, though, as she sometimes reveals details about people’s lives that they would prefer to keep hidden. My picks: “Lives of Girls and Women” or “Friend of My Youth”.

    Joyce Carol Oates is another writer like that. I haven’t read everything of hers, though, as she has had a long career and been very prolific. She writes details of people’s lives, some of which would not be on public view. She has written novels and collections of short stories. My picks: “Foxfire”, “We Were the Mulvaneys” and “I Am No One You Know”.

    Here is a list from someone on Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.ca/Guide-to-Joyce-Carol-Oates/lm/RTS5W5BL9TBJ0/ref=cm_lmt_srch_f_1_rsrscs1/701-2876200-2313900

    And finally (I have recommended this author before), Carol Shields, although her work is inconsistent. I always like her writing style, but I don’t always like her characters (which is weird, but you can’t continue reading a story when you have no sympathy for the characters, no matter how much you respect the author). My pick: her novel, “Unless”.

  2. Well, I am going to talk about authors rather than books, because that seems easiest.

    You can’t go wrong with Alice Munro and her collections of short stories. They are not always “comfortable” to read, though, as she sometimes reveals details about people’s lives that they would prefer to keep hidden. My picks: “Lives of Girls and Women” or “Friend of My Youth”.

    Joyce Carol Oates is another writer like that. I haven’t read everything of hers, though, as she has had a long career and been very prolific. She writes details of people’s lives, some of which would not be on public view. She has written novels and collections of short stories. My picks: “Foxfire”, “We Were the Mulvaneys” and “I Am No One You Know”.

    Here is a list from someone on Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.ca/Guide-to-Joyce-Carol-Oates/lm/RTS5W5BL9TBJ0/ref=cm_lmt_srch_f_1_rsrscs1/701-2876200-2313900

    And finally (I have recommended this author before), Carol Shields, although her work is inconsistent. I always like her writing style, but I don’t always like her characters (which is weird, but you can’t continue reading a story when you have no sympathy for the characters, no matter how much you respect the author). My pick: her novel, “Unless”.

    Okay, sorry if this shows up twice. I swear I just submitted it and yet nothing happened. So I am going to try again. 😦

  3. Well, I am going to talk about authors rather than books, because that seems easiest.

    You can’t go wrong with Alice Munro and her collections of short stories. They are not always “comfortable” to read, though, as she sometimes reveals details about people’s lives that they would prefer to keep hidden. My picks: “Lives of Girls and Women” or “Friend of My Youth”.

    Joyce Carol Oates is another writer like that. I haven’t read everything of hers, though, as she has had a long career and been very prolific. She writes details of people’s lives, some of which would not be on public view. She has written novels and collections of short stories. My picks: “Foxfire”, “We Were the Mulvaneys” and “I Am No One You Know”.

    And finally (I have recommended this author before), Carol Shields, although her work is inconsistent. I always like her writing style, but I don’t always like her characters (which is weird, but you can’t continue reading a story when you have no sympathy for the characters, no matter how much you respect the author). My pick: her novel, “Unless”.

    Check your spam comments list for two comments from me. I am going to try again, this time without the link that must have caused the problem. I am hoping that this comment finally makes it onto your site because I have tried twice already.

  4. 1) John Steinbeck, you can’t go wrong. If you haven’t read “East of Eden” read it immediately. It’s about 1.2 million times better and more epic than “Grapes of Wrath.”
    Oscar Wilde is also incredible in every way possible. “De Profundis” is a beautiful work he wrote in prison for his lover.
    Leo Tolstoi has changed my life. You either love Tolstoi or hate him, though. He wrote tons of social commentary along with his most famous work, “Anna Karinina.” Gotta read that one.

    2) My current favourite book is “This Side of Paradise” by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I’m rereading som Jack London short stories, they are great too. Although my all time favourite will probably remain “The Picture of Dorian Gray” by Oscar Wilde.

    3) “Murphy” by Samuel Beckett; “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man” by James Joyce (I love Joyce…); if you’ve never read all of “Don Quixote” by Cervantes oh man, you’ve got to!
    If you are looking for a fun, light read, anything by Augusten Burroughs (“Running With Scissors,” “Sellevision”) is great too.

    interestingly, all the authors I recommend are male, all the ones karen recommended are female. hmm.

  5. The last trilogy I read was a fantasy novel called “Rhaposdy” (book 1) by Elizabeth Hayden. The main character (unlike most fantasy novels written by men) is a woman who is a powerful figure in the three books. I REALLY liked these…I think you will if you like fantasy writers. JMHO.

    K.

  6. Michael Connolly books for mystery, Jan karon’s Mifford series, John Steibeck for classically good, and your header picture of “The Scream” reminded me of a book about the same, “The Rescue Artist”, by Edward Dolnick. A true crime novel about how the Scream was so easily stolen and the undercover work surrounding the “rescue” of many other works of art.

  7. Sorry. No Clue. Blogs are about all that I have time for reading lately. The two John Grissom books we listened to on our trip were good though. “The Broker” and “The Innocent Man” (based on a true story).

  8. Lately I have been into Fantasy, that way I can totally escape from the world for a while. Did I ever tell you that I am part of an online book club that works like Netflix? That way I pay my $15 a month and get to read whatever I want… love it!

    Ok, so for my recommendations. Well, there is this awesome book called Broken… er, I mean lets start over 😉

    1. Devlin’s Luck by Patricia Bray
    Again, fantasy novel but with really great morals etc built right into it.

    2. Children of Amarid by David B. Coe
    A totally enthralling fantasy. It has a completely new view on magic use (magic can be a pet pieve of mine, most authors stick with the tried and true, wizards only shoot fire etc. boring!)

    3. The Ring by Deborah Chester
    I don’t know, but books about a studly guy discovering the world of magic is just darn cool. Again, high morals and magic are combined for a completely happy book for me.

    If you aren’t into fantasy, I could make other recommendations. Oh, by the way did you want to borrow the second and third books of the twilight series? I could have them in the mail tomorrow 😉

  9. I have become attatched to Eragon and Eldest. They are a three part series but the third one has not come out yet. They are written by Christopher Paolini. Also if you enjoy romance books I like Nora Roberts and Jude Deveraux. Of course there is always all seven Harry Potter books. Hope this helps somehow. I always struggle to find books I like to read.

  10. I’ll give you some Authors I enjoy.. Stephanie Meyer; Jodi Picoult; Janet Evanovich; Kaled Hosseni; Meg Cabot; Jennifer Weiner; mmm, that is all I can think of for now.

  11. For our bookclub we decided to read SOUTH by Sir Earnest Shackleton. No, not Civil War–an Antarctica Expecition. Highly recommended–but we are all so busy, we are struggling with it, so apprapo a discussion while working on additional costumes, we decided to make it a “lending library night” focusing on LDS writers and series, as we all had different ones, and we want to share and get some others. Good thing it is at my house–I think I have the most!

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